"The Book of English Magic" by Carr-Gomm & Heygate -

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"The Book of English Magic" by Carr-Gomm & Heygate -

Post  ankh_f_n_khonsu on Wed Jun 24, 2009 6:57 pm



The image of the magician is exciting and tantalising, and familiar to us all. Think of Merlin or Gandalf and we think of excitement, mystery and adventure. But what do we feel or even know about real magicians – those figures who throughout history have practiced the kind of magic that for centuries was a forbidden art?

For reasons that will become clear as the 562 page The Book of English Magic unfolds, England has fostered the greatest variety of magicians in all the world, including not only the delightfully eccentric, but also figures who have played significant roles in the development of the arts and sciences.

Secretly we would all probably like to know a magician, or perhaps be one. And – extraordinary as it may seem – there has never been a greater opportunity to fulfill either of these ambitions, since there are now more practising wizards in England than at any other time in her history. Some will see this as an example of the triumph of irrationalism, others as evidence of a rebirth in an understanding of the world that is only now being touched upon by the most advanced physicists and cosmologists.

Whatever your beliefs about magic, this book is designed to introduce you to some of the most interesting contemporary practitioners of magic, and to many of the most important figures in the magical world of previous centuries. And to help you begin experiencing for yourself the world of magic and enchantment that has succeeded in intriguing generations of seekers, this comprehensive survey of English magic includes a rich menu of magical things to do and places to visit.

'Once in a blue moon a book comes out that you get a feeling is going to be a classic. Within minutes of receiving an advance copy, the Treadwell’s staff all got that prickly feeling on the back of the neck. … This is a big book, a real door-stopper. Yet, it’s an introductory volume to magic in England: part history, part practical, part resource guide, part theory. Illustrated, filled with interviews with practitioners and experts, it is the kind of newcomers’ book that an intelligent novice dreams of. The two authors spoke with many of the most senior people in the British magical community, and their commentaries (interspersed through the book) make fascinating reading, and serve as a personal touch to guide the reader. Wicca, druidry, runes, John Dee, Golden Dawn — all in their English setting.' - Treadwell's Books
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